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Majjhima Nikāya

The Middle-length Discourses The Majjhima Nikāya, or “Middle-length Discourses” of the Buddha, is the second of the five nikāyas (collections) of the Sutta Pitaka. This nikāya consists of 152 discourses by the Buddha and his chief disciples, which together constitute a comprehensive body of teaching concerning all aspects of the …

Dīgha Nikāya

Sutta Piṭaka : Dīgha Nikāya The Long Discourses The Digha Nikaya, or “Collection of Long Discourses” (Pali digha = “long”) is the first division of the Sutta Pitaka, and consists of thirty-four suttas, grouped into three vaggas, or divisions: Silakkhandha-vagga — The Division Concerning Morality (13 suttas) Maha-vagga — The …

Sutta Piṭaka

The Basket of Suttas The Sutta Piṭaka, the second division of the Tipiṭaka, consists of more than 10,000 suttas (discourses) delivered by the Buddha and his close disciples during and shortly after the Buddha’s forty-five year teaching career, as well as many additional verses by other members of the Sangha. …

Vinaya Piṭaka

The Basket of the Discipline The Vinaya Pitaka, the first division of the Tipitaka, is the textual framework upon which the monastic community (Sangha) is built. It includes not only the rules governing the life of every Theravada bhikkhu (monk) and bhikkhuni (nun), but also a host of procedures and …

Sanghamitta Theri

‘This fullmoon day of Unduvap, the Buddhists of Sri Lanka honour the memory of Sanghamitta Theri who together with her brother Mahinda Thera was responsible for the establishing of Buddhism in this country 2300 years ago in the reign of Devanampiya Tissa. A significant feature is that when Mahinda Thera …

Tri-pitaka (Tipitaka) : Three Baskets

by Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda in ‘What Buddhists Believe’ ‘Tripitaka is the collection of the teachings of the Buddha over 45 years in the Pali language, and it consists of Sutta – conventional teaching, Vinaya – disciplinary code, and Abhidhamma – moral psychology. The Tripitaka was compiled and arranged in …

什么是无常无我?

佛教“无常”与“无我”观点的提出是以缘起论和五蕴论为基础的。“无常”与“无我”指出一切事物都不会永恒存在,都会经历一个从产生到灭亡的过程。 诸行无常、诸法无我 “无常”一词的意思是说,一切事物都不会一成不变,都会经历从生到灭的过程。具体点说,就是每一个事物都会经历成、住、坏、空四个阶段。 “成”,是指事物的生成;“住”,是指事物会在一定时间里处于一种相对来说比较稳定的、无大变化的状态;“坏”,是指在住期之后,会发生很大的变异,并且时时处于一种不稳定的状态之中;“空”,是指事物已经毁灭,形体不存。 联系到人生现象上就是生、老、病、死。“无我”是指一切事物不仅形体不会永存,而且精神也会随之消灭,即不存在一个常恒的精神主体。 佛教“无常”与“无我”观点的提出是以缘起论和五蕴论为思想基础的。世界只不过是五种元素按照一定的规律,在一定的条件下聚合而成,那么各种事物当然也就会随着条件的变化而发生变化了。既然如此,一切事物自然不会永恒长存,不仅形体是这样,精神也是这样。 无常、无我的意义 “无常”与“无我”作为一种对世界的认知理论是与四圣谛的人生观点紧密相连的。既然世间的一切是无永恒主体的,那么它就不值得人们去追求。 然而,世俗之人由于无知,错把“无常”与“无我”的东西当成有常有我的东西来追求,这就必然陷入痛苦。所以要消除痛苦,就要消除人们的无知,认识到“无常”与“无我”的道理。 责任编辑:如是我闻 文章修订1.1 2011-05-01 – Posted by CFFong

Santuṭṭhi : Contentment

‘When one is content with what is blameless, trifling and easily gained; when one’s mind is not distressed because of a lodging, robe, drink, and food, one is not hindered anywhere. These qualities, rightly said to conform to the ascetic life, are acquired by a bhikkhu who is content and …